DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Before anything, some clarifications about violence are necessary. What really is meant by violence? Everyone has a different definition of the word “violence”.  Some feel that a slap or a shove is not being violent. Others think that any angry physical contact can be considered violence. To many Nigerians, the words “domestic violence” is suggestive of an abusive husband who easily gets out of control, is cruel and always hurts.  You probably have different definition of domestic violence than your neighbor. However, let us examine the popular definition of violence which is, “exerting physical force so as to injure or abuse”. This definition, as good as it, is incomplete for our purpose. This is because, when we talk of domestic violence, we are speaking of five different types of violence at the same time. These are physical violence, sexual violence, psychological violence, property violence and verbal violence.

Let us define each of these types of violence in our context.

  1. Physical Violence

Physical violence is what comes to most people’s minds when we mention the words “domestic violence”. This type of violence includes choking, grabbing, hitting, hitting with weapons or objects, kicking, physical force to make a person do something or go somewhere against that person’s will, punching,  scratching, slapping and so on.

 

2.      Sexual Violence

When someone forces another person to have sexual intercourse by means of physical force, the threat of force, or by use of a weapon, it is considered rape. And rape is one form of sexual violence. Sexual violence is not something that happens only between strangers. In fact, a good number of rapes occur between individuals who know each other. Other forms of sexual violence include forced sexual activity such as oral sex, sodomy, and so on; forced sex with animals, forcing a person to have sexual intercourse or sexual activity with another person, or forced sexual activity with objects. In Nigeria, it is now an offence against the law for a man to force his wife to have sex with him. Spousal rape, as it is known in legal angle, is on the increase in Nigeria.  

 

3.                  Property Violence

When violent threats and actions are directed at a partner through destruction of property or pets, it is known as property violence. If a woman watches her husband breakup furniture or dishes, or punches a hole in the door, she is likely to feel frightened and insecure; and willing to agree with him to get him to stop. Property violence is a systematic attempt to force the other person to do our bidding by destroying or damaging property. The property can belong to both parties; it could be that of the victim or a third party. The aim is to create fear and panic and to force the victim to succumb; to deny the partner use of the property, to reduce his or her partner’s self-esteem and to make him or her powerless. The transfer of aggression from the victim to property is what I called, “damage syndrome”. Cases of men setting their spouse’s wrappers on fire are common place; so also are cases of women venting their anger on properties by destroying or damaging same or even setting family buildings and household properties on fire. This is one aspect of domestic violence that is on the increase in Nigeria; yet, property violence cases have not been tested successfully in the courts in Nigeria.

 

4.      Psychological Violence

Psychological violence can be expressed in various ways, including controlling another person’s thinking and behavior. A man may accomplish this by making either direct or veiled threats of physical violence. He may combine these threats with occasional violent acts as a means of keeping his partner constantly intimidated and subjected. When she is paralyzed with fear, he can feel in control. The aim of psychological violence is to damage the victim’s sense of self-worth, to make the victim feel powerless and empty. The victim has to give up his or her own values and viewpoints in order to keep the other partner from being out of control. The partner may also try to breakdown the other person’s self-esteem by degrading him or her through name calling, humiliation, and demanding that he or she be put first always. Because of extreme jealousy or insecurity, the partner may dictate the other’s every move and accuse him or her of things he or she could not possibly have done. This may get to the point of trying to isolate the partner at home, with minimal or even no outside social contacts. This results in hostage syndrome in which the captive becomes emotionally dependent on the captor. Because the captor controls the captive, he or she feels he/she cannot survive without him/her. In the short run, this may be what he/she wants. But, in the long run, it will eventually destroy the relationship.

 

5.      Verbal Violence

Verbal violence is expressed through nagging, slander, and other forms of verbal insults. Verbal violence is a very different type of violence. Except in rare cases, for instance, (when the offender lies about the victim publicly before witnesses and can be charged with slander), there is no agency that the victim can call for help. The pain of verbal abuse goes deep into the self and festers there, but because nothing shows on the surface, it will not win the victim even sympathy, much less actual assistance. Worst still, verbal violence all too often goes unrecognized, except at a level that the victim cannot even understand himself or herself. The victim knows that he/she is suffering, and vaguely knows where the pain is coming from; but because the aggressor is so well hidden, the victim  is likely to blame himself or herself instead of the aggressor, thereby adding to his/her own misery.  

Studies have revealed that for every person in Nigeria who is suffering physical abuse, there are hundreds suffering the effects of verbal violence. For every person who just got a fist in the face, there are hundreds who just took a verbal blow to the gut. Interestingly, there are major differences between these two kinds of injury. The physical attack is at least obvious and unmistakable. When someone slugs you physically, you can call the police. The physical attack hurts horribly and leaves a mark. But it is usually over fast, and the mark is evidence in favour of the victim and against the offender. Verbal violence has destroyed more relationships and homes than all other types of violence put together.

 

These five types of violence have several things in common.

  1. Against The Law: They are all against the law. Physical or sexually assaulting someone, verbally abusing someone, threatening to assault or kill another person or destroying another person’s property are all against the law.
  2. Causes Emotional Trauma: They each can have very serious emotional or physical consequences for the victim, unintended victims like children, relations and the offender as well.
  3. Instrument of Intimidation: They are ways in which someone can dominate, control, manipulate and intimidate another person.
  4. Primitive Way of Dealing with Anger: Any type of violence is only one way of dealing with anger, conflict and disagreement in a relationship.

From the foregoing is evident that domestic violence affects men and women of all ages, races, religions and incomes. It is estimated that approximately over three hundred thousand Nigerians households experience at least one domestic violence episode each year. Victims of violence may be spouse, children, or the elderly.

When violence occurs between adults in the family, men and women are equally likely to be the victim. However, due to the differences in strength, it is women who suffer the most serious injuries. Research has also revealed that when women do act violently, it is usually in response to their being abused for a period of time. Women are also more likely to violent in self-defense, whereas men may attribute their violence to controlling their spouse’s behavior.

Impacts of Domestic Violence

Homicide: Spouse abuse in any form is very dangerous. It is estimated that between 25% and 30% of homicides are domestic in nature. When a domestic homicide occurs between husband and wife, the chances are equal that either partner can be the victim. Again, research has shown that that most women murder their husbands in self-defense seven times more often than men murder their wives in self-defense.

Battering: According to Daniel Jay Sonkin and Michael Durphy in 70% – 80% of the battering incidents, the batterer (and sometimes the battered woman) is under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. When the batterer is under the influence of alcohol or other drugs at the time of violence, he or she is likely to commit more serious violence that may lead to injuries requiring medical care or even death.

Child Abuse: In over one-third of families where spouse abuse is a problem, child abuse also occurs. This abuse may be physical, sexual or verbal and either parent may be the abuser. In families where there are children, the children have either witnessed the violence between their parents or are aware of its occurrence. It is estimated that over one million children witness family violence annually in Nigeria. Many children try to stop the violence between their parents, only to suffer injuries themselves. Similarly, many children are injured when the violence between their parents spills over on them. Many have also died due to arguments between their parents. On 27th February, 2014 Ayelehin Kehinde killed a 2-year-old boy after having argument with his mother. He is said to have caused the death of the boy after he grabbed the sleeping child off his mother’s back and smashed him on the concrete ground. The incident occurred in the Supare, Akoko area of Ondo State and the child was said to have died on the way to hospital. “Cruel”, you said?

Nevertheless, whether a child is directly abused or not, researches have revealed that children who grow up in homes where there is domestic violence often develop serious emotional problems later in life. An abused child sooner or later turns out to be a loose child, determined for the worst in life. Many of these children grow up feeling helpless, angry, frustrated, distrustful, fearful, and confused. While many more grow up to become more violent, aggressive, cruel and wayward; providing ready foot soldiers for such violent groups as Boko Haram, militants,  Area Boys and Neighbourhood Cults.

Impacts of Violence on Children: Over seventy-five percent of men who saw their fathers abusing their mothers or were themselves victims of child abuse turned out to be violent. This tells us one way violence affects the children. Boys learn that violence is an acceptable way of dealing with anger, frustration and stress. Girls learn that they must live with violence. Studies have also show that violence affects children before birth. Women are known to be more verbally violent during pregnancy. It is estimated that one-fifth of all women who are abused are struck during pregnancy. Unfortunately, many of these women miscarriage as a result of the violence.

Impacts of Violence on Society: Spouse abuse does not only affect the family involved. Police officers responding to domestic violence calls are often injured. Family members or neighbours who try to intervene may also get hurt. Women miss work because of injuries, men miss work because of arrests. Sometimes, people lose their jobs. Many times women need medical care, which costs money. If medical insurance is used, rates subsequently increase. If the court is involved, there are attorney’s fees and more work absenteeism. Children often get caught between their mother and father; in-laws may get involved and tension between families may rise. Spouse abuse is a prevalent and serious problem in Nigerian homes.  

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ABOUT CEMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION

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C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION

(…Building Career, Restoring Hope)

Welcome To C-Employment Organization.

The C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION is conceptualized to provide the following services:

  • Career Building
  • Employment & Job Search Advise
  • Job Hunt Training
  • Apprenticeship & Traineeship
  • Employment Partners Services & Programmes Related to Employment
  • Civilian Employment for Service Personnel
  • Agency Services
  • Business Development
  • Skills Acquisition
  • Personnel Management & Community Relations
  • Conflicts Management & Negotiations
  • Events Management & General Contracting

Are you a young graduate? Let us help you get job.

Are you an Ex-Service Personnel? Let us help you identify and translate your Service experience, skills, and ability into marketable tools which will be appreciated by a civilian employer

Online Job Hunt Course Available. For Participation, Booking or if you would like additional tips, clarifications or inquiry, please contact the staff at the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, http://http://www.cemployment.wordpress.com, or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com,  Room #3 WDC, Hospital Road, Ogale, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria . Telephone: +234 8096811012, +2348036694027.

 

Civilian Employment for Service Personnel Course

The Civilian Employment for Service Personnel Course is a revolutionary new tool for all Service personnel to translate their military training and experience into skills that could be used in the corporate world. The course is the distillation of all military experiences; checklists, sample letters and other step-by-step written examples are also provided to guide you all along.

 

By undergoing this course, you will be harnessing and translating your military trainings and experiences into skills that are very useful and of high demand in the corporate world.    

 

Online Job Hunt Course Available. For Participation, Booking or if you would like additional tips, clarifications or inquiry, please contact the staff at the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, http://www.cemployment.wordpress.com, or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com,  Room #3 WDC, Hospital Road, Ogale, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria . Telephone: +234 8096811012, +2348036694027.

GENERAL BACKGROUND  

In Nigeria, transition from one employment to another seems to be slow, cumbersome and mostly unplanned.  Many Nigerian Service personnel prefer to die in Service. They resent the idea of retirement and regard anyone who talks about job change as the devil out to sentence people to suffering. The reasons behind this mindset are not farfetched. In Nigeria, the fear of joblessness and penury is the beginning of wisdom. This fear, which has been fertilizing corruption in the country over the years, has also forced many government employees to cut down their age so as to continue in Service. The increasing gap and lack of viable bridge linking military Service and civilian employment opportunities is another major contributing factor to Service personnel’s lukewarm attitude towards retirement.

Those leaving the Services face new and rather different challenges when they move to a second career in civilian life. But, they take with them highly valuable skills, moulded by a programme of training, experience and assessment, into this new, and for most, unfamiliar environment. The truth is that the personal qualities and skills of Servicemen and women have much to offer a very wide range of civilian employers. No doubt, the military pride itself of having the best trained workforce in Nigeria.

The best time to ask for job change or retirement from Service is when you are still very useful to yourself, to your family, to your community, to your country and to the world. Retiring when you have become a liability is like sentencing oneself to perpetual suffering and perdition no matter the amount of wealth you might have accumulated. Besides, you will never know how useful you are to the corporate world until you crossover. But, the crossing over requires information, planning and management of your skills and experiences and appropriately matching same in the market place for the mutual benefits of all concerned.

Online Job Hunt Course Available. For Participation, Booking or if you would like additional tips, clarifications or inquiry, please contact the staff at the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, http://www.cemployment.wordpress.com, or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com,  Room #3 WDC, Hospital Road, Ogale, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria . Telephone: +234 8096811012, +2348036694027.

 

 

 ABOUT CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT FOR SERVICE PERSONNEL COURSE

The Civilian Employment for Service Personnel Course aims to make valuable advice on obtaining job offers   available to Service personnel; help identify and translate Service experience, skills and ability into marketable tools which will be appreciated by a civilian employer; and guide ex-Service personnel to translate their military and paramilitary training and experiences into skills that could be used in the corporate world.

The transition from life in the armed Services to a civilian occupation needs to be planned in advance. It is to make this planning pleasurable and the transition worthwhile and smooth that the Civilian Employment for Service Personnel Course was conceived and targeted to help those Service personnel seeking civilian employment have a rewarding new career.  Civilian Employment for Service Personnel Course will in addition continually analyze and upgrade the processes and offer some straightforward and simple advice in how Service personnel personal energy and determination can be harnessed in the civilian job hunt; as well as providing undiluted guides to civilian employment for Service personnel. In making the transition to the world outside the Service easier, Civilian Employment for Service Personnel Course will also prepare the Service personnel to tackle constructively the obstacles associated with life outside the uniform. It will as well compliment the efforts of the Nigerian Armed Forces Resettlement Center, Oshodi, Lagos, through its Business Section which is organized to provide the retiring Service personnel who want to dabble into business the requisite skills and trade that would empower them to set up and properly manage their own businesses so as to enjoy a productive life in retirement. It is the duty of C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION to ensure that you make the transition successfully out of the uniform into the suit, agbada, babariga or jumpar.  

Online Job Hunt Course Available. For Participation, Booking or if you would like additional tips, clarifications or inquiry, please contact the staff at the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, http://http://www.cemployment.wordpress.com, or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com,  Room #3 WDC, Hospital Road, Ogale, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria . Telephone: +234 8096811012, +2348036694027.

 

 

 C-EMPLOYMENT COURSE CONTENT

The C-Employment Course is designed to cover amongst others the following areas:

  1. Transferable skills analysis.
  2. Financial and domestic self scrutiny.
  3. Effective job hunting.
  4. Networking and contact building.
  5. Curriculum Vitae and marketing letter writing.
  6. Interview techniques.
  7. Negotiating the right deal.
  8. Secure financial future planning.

 

Online Job Hunt Course Available. For Participation, Booking or if you would like additional tips, clarifications or inquiry, please contact the staff at the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, http://http://www.cemployment.wordpress.com, or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com,  Room #3 WDC, Hospital Road, Ogale, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria . Telephone: +234 8096811012, +2348036694027.

 

 Importance of Service Skills and Experiences

Military and paramilitary personnel constantly contribute to corporate tasks. Discipline, loyalty and teamwork lies at the heart of Service ethos. Service life also consists of continual training and retraining coupled with constant challenging exposures and placements. All which combined to build him or her for greater performances. At the end of such a military career a great deal of help and advice for the smooth transition to a second career is necessary. This ultimately takes the ex-Service’s personal skills and experiences to the market place where success becomes mutually beneficial for both the ex-Service personnel and potential employers.  

To many civilians, the world inhabited by those in uniform is both strange and divorced from their own. This myth need to be broken. There are several aspects of the military whose direct application to the corporate world is obvious. The Gulf War of the early 1990s is such a case in point. The bringing together of such a vast supply of personnel and materials is an obvious distribution miracle, employing the highest standards of Just-in-Time (JIT) planning and coordination. Similarly, the daily briefings that we all watched were superb examples of marketing and sales presentation.  But, to the average Nigerian in the corporate world, the mind image of those in uniform is formed from old-fashioned notions and a plethora of bad films. Irrespective of the fact that the Service world and the corporate world are the same in all ramifications, the corporate manager still exclaims, “Military man, umm, well, there is leadership nonetheless and he can organize tanks and riffles, but what can he do for me?”  On the other hand, the man in uniform is just as biased, blinkered and ignorant of his civilian counterpart in the business world. To the uniform man, his counterpart in the business world is an opportunist, a profiteer, and above all, a “bloody civilian” who lacks corporate organization.  But, in very many ways, managers, both in and out of uniform face the same problems. A critical analysis of the under listed functions will revealed that managers in and out of uniform perform the same duties and carryout identical responsibilities. All that is needed is better understanding of each other, proper cooperation and appreciation of one another.

  1. Recruiting, training and retraining skilled workers.
  2. Improving effectiveness.
  3. Improving efficiency.
  4. Equipping, re-equipping and updating.
  5. Presenting to the public, a face of efficiency, effectiveness and competition.
  6. Motivating employees; satisfying top management, shareholders and all stakeholders.
  7.  Finding solutions to residual, potential and emerging problems.
  8. Strategic planning.
  9. Budgeting and financial resources control.

10.Adapting to the changing marketplace and changing circumstances, etc.

 

Online Job Hunt Course Available. For Participation, Booking or if you would like additional tips, clarifications or inquiry, please contact the staff at the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, http://http://www.cemployment.wordpress.com, or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com,  Room #3 WDC, Hospital Road, Ogale, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria . Telephone: +234 8096811012, +2348036694027.

 

 

           

Placement Aid for Ex-Service Personnel

 In addition to the above, the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION runs a quick and easy placement service to assist ex-service personnel who are currently redundant, serving a redundancy notice, unemployed, or on a short-term contract, get gainful employment.

Ex-Servicemen and women are like Youth Corps Members who have successfully completed their tertiary education and one year compulsory national service and are looking into the future with hope; harnessing and marshalling their education, training and experiences for proper engagement.

All the individual needs to do is to apply to the Organization to be included on a Placement Database. Companies looking to recruit will then be invited to contact the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, who will search the Database for candidates. To maintain confidentiality, an individual’s name will not be divulged to any company unless it wants to interview the person. The service is free to our candidates, while companies will pay a fee when the individual is recruited. To be included on the Database, you will complete a Placement Registration Form. Please contact the Placement Officer at http://www.cemployment.org.ng or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria. Telephone: +2348096811012

Online Job Hunt Course Available. For Participation, Booking or if you would like additional tips, clarifications or inquiry, please contact the staff at the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, http://http://www.cemployment.wordpress.com, or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com,  Room #3 WDC, Hospital Road, Ogale, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria . Telephone: +234 8096811012, +2348036694027.

 

 Workers Engagement

Freedom is knowing where to start and reaching for your destined future. The C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION is a leading equal opportunity staffing and recruiting agency that provides workforce solutions, direct placement and exciting careers with top employers in commerce and industry.  We help you find the job opportunities that fit your career goals and experience. We match employers to employees. We offer both permanent and temporary employments. We do not discriminate on the grounds of race, colour, tribe, sex, religion, social or political affiliations. Start your job search with us today. Let us walk hand-in-hand with you into the future!

Online Job Hunt Course Available. For Participation, Booking or if you would like additional tips, clarifications or inquiry, please contact the staff at the C-EMPLOYMENT ORGANIZATION, http://http://www.cemployment.wordpress.com, or E-mail: c.employments@gmail.com,  Room #3 WDC, Hospital Road, Ogale, P. O. Box 517, Nchia Eleme, 5010501, Nigeria . Telephone: +234 8096811012, +2348036694027.

 

 

FGN to Create 460,000 Jobs Through Growth Employment

FGN to Create 460,000 Jobs through Growth Employment Project

The Federal Government of Nigeria is targeting 460,000 jobs at the minimum in the next four years through the Growth and Employment Project Scheme.

 

The Minister of Industry, Trade and Investment, Mr. Olusegun Aganga, stated this on Thursday 22nd February, 2014, in Abuja during the inauguration of an eight-member steering committee for the GEM project. Aganga said the project was aimed at enhancing job creation and increasing non-oil growth in specific high-potential value chain sectors, and would help to create 110,000 direct and 350,000 indirect jobs

 

The committee is chaired by the Minister, Mr. Olusegun Aganga, with members drawn from the ministries of Finance, Information, Communications Technology, Culture and Tourism, and Agriculture and Rural Development, as well as the National Orientation Agency.

 

Aganga revealed that the committee was critical to enhancing inclusive economic growth through job creation and wealth generation.

 

He said, “The GEM project is very important to the Federal Government and the Nigerian economy. It is an employment project by the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment, supported by the World Bank and the United Kingdom Department for International Development.

 

“The World Bank is providing a loan of about $160m, while the DFID is providing a grant of about $100m. The project is aimed at job creation and increased non-oil growth in specific high potential value chain sectors.

 

The GEM project was conceptualized after the conduct of the Growth Poll Studies in 2007. The study identified key sectors with potential growth in the economy and with high potential to generate a lot of jobs. “This is what the Nigerian Industrial Revolution Plan and the National Enterprise Development Programme, which were launched by President Goodluck Jonathan recently, seek to achieve.”

Aganga said. He also pointed out that his Ministry’s working with the World Bank and DFID had already identified eight key sectors with potential for generating employment, adding that the impact of the implementation of the GEM scheme would be felt in no distant future.

He said, “It is expected that the GEM programme, which will run from June 2013 to September 2018, will create a minimum of about 460,000 jobs, comprising 110,000 direct and 350,000 indirect jobs.

“There are eight priority sectors that we have identified based on their growth and employment potential, which are also areas of focus in our NIRP and NEDEP.

“They are: Information and Communications Technology; wholesale and retail; hospitality and tourism; meat and leather; construction and real estate; entertainment industry; agro processing, light manufacturing and entrepreneurial development.”

Speaking during the event, the World Bank Sector Leader, Finance and Private Sector Development in Nigeria, Mr. Michael Wong, said the bank was committed to the successful implementation of the project, adding that it would reach about 10,000 enterprises within the implementation period.

FGN to Create 460,000 Jobs Through Growth Employment Project

FGN to Create 460,000 Jobs through Growth Employment Project

By Ollorwi Osaro

The Federal Government of Nigeria is targeting 460,000 jobs at the minimum in the next four years through the Growth and Employment Project Scheme.

 

The Minister of Industry, Trade and Investment, Mr. Olusegun Aganga, stated this on Thursday 22nd February, 2014, in Abuja during the inauguration of an eight-member steering committee for the GEM project. Aganga said the project was aimed at enhancing job creation and increasing non-oil growth in specific high-potential value chain sectors, and would help to create 110,000 direct and 350,000 indirect jobs

 

The committee is chaired by the Minister, Mr. Olusegun Aganga, with members drawn from the ministries of Finance, Information, Communications Technology, Culture and Tourism, and Agriculture and Rural Development, as well as the National Orientation Agency.

 

Aganga revealed that the committee was critical to enhancing inclusive economic growth through job creation and wealth generation.

 

He said, “The GEM project is very important to the Federal Government and the Nigerian economy. It is an employment project by the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment, supported by the World Bank and the United Kingdom Department for International Development.

 

“The World Bank is providing a loan of about $160m, while the DFID is providing a grant of about $100m. The project is aimed at job creation and increased non-oil growth in specific high potential value chain sectors.

 

The GEM project was conceptualized after the conduct of the Growth Poll Studies in 2007. The study identified key sectors with potential growth in the economy and with high potential to generate a lot of jobs. “This is what the Nigerian Industrial Revolution Plan and the National Enterprise Development Programme, which were launched by President Goodluck Jonathan recently, seek to achieve.”

Aganga said. He also pointed out that his Ministry’s working with the World Bank and DFID had already identified eight key sectors with potential for generating employment, adding that the impact of the implementation of the GEM scheme would be felt in no distant future.

He said, “It is expected that the GEM programme, which will run from June 2013 to September 2018, will create a minimum of about 460,000 jobs, comprising 110,000 direct and 350,000 indirect jobs.

“There are eight priority sectors that we have identified based on their growth and employment potential, which are also areas of focus in our NIRP and NEDEP.

“They are: Information and Communications Technology; wholesale and retail; hospitality and tourism; meat and leather; construction and real estate; entertainment industry; agro processing, light manufacturing and entrepreneurial development.”

Speaking during the event, the World Bank Sector Leader, Finance and Private Sector Development in Nigeria, Mr. Michael Wong, said the bank was committed to the successful implementation of the project, adding that it would reach about 10,000 enterprises within the implementation period.

NPAN Condemned Proposed Nigerian Wiretap Law

The Newspaper Proprietors’ Association of Nigeria (NPAN) has condemned the alleged move by the Federal government to empower security agents to intercept and record electronic communications between individuals and track data use from internet service providers and mobile networks.

In a communiqué issued at Abuja by the association at the end of its Executive Council meeting, the body described the move as a violation of the constitutional guarantee of free speech and an invitation to arbitrariness.

It urged the Federal Government to withdraw the bill in line with its constitutional obligation to protect the rights and liberties of the citizens.

The Plight of Ekporo People

A WELCOME ADDRESS PRESENTED BY THE TRADITIONAL RULERS, CHIEFS, ELDERS AND PEOPLE OF EBUBU TO REVEREND RICHARD NEUBAUER AND OFALARU ELEME, USA ON THE OCCASION OF THEIR SYMPATHY VISIT AND PRESENTATION OF RELIEVE MATERIALS TO THE INTERNALLY DISPLACED PERSONS (IDP) OF EKPORO AT THE COMMUNITY SECONDARY SCHOOL FIELD EBUBU ON THURSDAY 30TH JANUARY, 2014.

 

On behalf of the Traditional Rulers, Chiefs, Elders and the entire people of Ebubu, we heartily welcome you all to Ebubu. This gathering courtesy Rev. Richard Neubauer and OFALARU ELEME, USA is to show great concern for the security and welfare of the people of Ekporo in particular and Eleme in general. We thank Reverend Richard Neubauer of the Assemblies of God Church, Arlington Church, Virginia, USA; Mr. Benjamin Osaro-Olai, President of OFALARU ELEME, USA; all the Executives and Members of OFALARU ELEME, USA and the entire Eleme people in Diaspora for the expression of love and demonstration of the fact that truly you are your brothers’ keepers. God bless you all. 

 

As we gather here to present relieve materials to the internally displaced persons of Ekporo it is pertinent that we proffer possible solutions to increasing spate of violence in our communities and endeavour to resolve  issues that cumulated to the sacking of Ekporo and displacing of the entire population.

 

It could be recalled that in 1983 Eleme was attacked by the Okrikas and over 100 people were killed including women and children. Again in 1993, Okrika people rose up with arms and exterminated Ekporo and other Eleme communities; old and young were massacred. After mowing the place down our properties were looted and houses set ablaze, Ekporo was totally annihilated. About 90 people mostly women and children were murdered and many wounded while properties worth millions of Naira were either looted or destroyed in that attack. On Monday 4th October, 1999 by 10.05a.m, Eleme was again attacked by aggressive Okrikans as their attempt to abruptly close the Port Harcourt Refinery Company gate in Alesa Eleme with a coffin was questioned by Eleme people. The same night, on 4th October, 1999 by 11pm the people of Ogu over-ran and sacked Ekporo town.

 

On September 11th 2013, Ekporo was invaded again. The councilor representing Ekporo Ward 5 in the Eleme Local Government Legislative Assembly Hon. Nelson Ogbuji was murdered in cool blood. Also killed in the recent attack were Edwin Sakanwi and Madam Mimi Okundonwi who was raped and slaughtered, while many others sustained various degrees of gunshot wounds, several women were raped, homes and churches were looted, burnt or pulled down by the invading Ogu people.

 

Our investigations have revealed that whenever Wakrike (Okrika/Ogu) sons and daughters are in position of authority at the State or Federal level, they will invade, sack and take over Eleme community.  Why is this always so?

 

Recently, six Ogu youths were arrested by the Joint Task Force (JTF) operatives with seven AK47 riffles, 164 rounds of ammunition and six locally made canon launchers in connection with the invasion of Ekporo. Unfortunately, the media reports linking the suspects to Hon. Evans Bipi and Senator George Sekibo have not been taken seriously by both the Nigerian Government and security agencies.  Rather, the people of Ogu and their cohorts are making frantic efforts to shift the blames and ownership of these arms. Nigeria is our collective country, we suppose? The Government of Nigeria is of the people, by the people and for the people, we believe? As major host to internally displaced persons of Ekporo, we make bold to ask, will the people of Ekporo celebrate one hundred years of Nigeria’s nationhood in exile? What is our government doing for Ekporo people to return home?

 

Ladies and gentlemen with this brief historical facts and current happenstance, it is clear that only the international community can save Eleme from extinction by checking these our neighbours’ penchant for territorial expansion and ensuring that the Federal Government of Nigeria demarcates the boundary between Okrika/Ogu and Eleme.

 

This done an unbroken programme of empowerment is solicited for the people of Ekporo to cushion the effects of continual displacement.

 

It is disheartening to note that today Ekporo is a ghost town courtesy Ogu warriors and their warlords. The people of Ekporo are today refuges in Eteo, Gbam, Norwa, Baraobara, Ogale, Alode, Agbonchia, Akpajo, Alesa, Onne, Aleto and Ebubu. Family lives have been disrupted, infrastructure in Ekporo have totally broken down, no school is in session in Ekporo, the social and economic live of the people have been paralyzed, there is no protection for a population of over 5,000 people of Ekporo, including children, women and the elderly; no access to justice; the people’s rights are daily trampled under foot and no solution seems to be in sight. My brothers and sisters, today, Nigeria is preparing for general elections; the Rivers State Government is also getting ready for local government elections; will Ekporo people participate in these elections processes from exile? If so, why? If not, how?  The plan to extinct Ekporo is premeditated and is being systematically executed. Eleme is standing between the devil and the deep-blue sea. The environments that have been highly polluted by multinational and national oil companies are at war with us, killing us slowly by the day. Our Okrika and Ogu neighbours are killing us intermittently with guns. We are in trouble. We need special protection. That is why the international community must come to our aid before we are all killed and our God given land taken over.

 

Finally, ladies and gentlemen, we are here today to ease the pains of a people. We are here to share in the suffering of a people. We are here to give relieve materials to internally displaced persons of Ekporo. We are here to open a new chapter in the historical life of the people of Ekporo; to wipe out their tears; to sympathize with them; to encourage them and to give them hope and motivate them to look unto God for a better Nigeria where the rule of law will prevail and people will live in peace with their neighbours.  We must move beyond the jamboree to save Eleme, an ethnic nationality at the verge of extinction arising from aggressive neighbours and exploitative multinationals backed by corrupt and oppressive government. This occasion should provide a springboard for us to act as a united people; as a uniting factor to wake us from our slumber as the international community become interested in our plight and extend a helping hand.

 

The choice of Ebubu for the rebirth of brotherly love in Eleme is not a mistake. Ebubu has always been the galvanizing ancient city of Eleme. When it is difficult and the people of Eleme converge on Ebubu, solutions are always in sight. We are at the right place. You are welcome to Ebubu! Eleme mma wii owee!!!

 

 

 

Chief Osaro Ollorwi                                              HRH Chief Emmanuel O. Bebe

One Eh Aluebo/ Secretary Ebubu                        One Eh Ebubu xiii

Council of Traditional Rulers,

Chiefs & Elders